Washington Post: Ron Paul Signed Off On Racist Newsletters

Editor’s Note – I was a radio talk show host for much of this time and some people would send me copies of his newsletter and indeed there were parts that were antisemitic and presented strange conspiracy theories. I was repulsed by those newsletters and by similar publications such as The Spotlight. Late night talk radio and the short wave programs talked about these Newsletters from time to time so it is unlikely in the extreme that the content did not get back to him. I do consider some of Ron Paul’s views to be antisemitic, but unfortunately too many of his supporters are antisemitic as I  have witnessed both online and at large GOP events where Ron Paul supporters are bused in such as CPAC.

Washington Post:

The Republican presidential candidate has denied writing inflammatory passages in the pamphlets from the 1990s and said recently that he did not read them at the time or for years afterward. Numerous colleagues said he does not hold racist views.

But people close to Paul’s operations said he was deeply involved in the company that produced the newsletters, Ron Paul & Associates, and closely monitored its operations, signing off on articles and speaking to staff members virtually every day.

“It was his newsletter, and it was under his name, so he always got to see the final product. . . . He would proof it,’’ said Renae Hathway, a former secretary in Paul’s company and a supporter of the Texas congressman.

Yet a review of his enterprises reveals a sharp-eyed businessman who for nearly two decades oversaw the company and a nonprofit foundation, intertwining them with his political career. The newsletters, which were launched in the mid-1980s and bore such names as the Ron Paul Survival Report, were produced by a company Paul dissolved in 2001.

The company shared offices with his campaigns and foundation at various points, according to those familiar with the operation. Public records show Paul’s wife and daughter were officers of the newsletter company and foundation; his daughter also served as his campaign treasurer.

Jesse Benton, a presidential campaign spokesman, said that the accounts of Paul’s involvement were untrue and that Paul was practicing medicine full time when “the offensive material appeared under his name.” Paul “abhors it, rejects it and has taken responsibility for it as he should have better policed the work being done under his masthead,” Benton said. He did not comment on Paul’s business strategy.

Mark Elam, a longtime Paul associate whose company printed the newsletters, said Paul “was a busy man” at the time. “He was in demand as a speaker; he was traveling around the country,’’ Elam said in an interview coordinated by Paul’s campaign. “I just do not believe he was either writing or regularly editing this stuff.’’

About Chuck Norton

Political issue strategist and communications professional. I write about politics, education, economics, morality and philosophy.
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