Kyle Katarn to appear in a Star Wars spinoff movie by JJ Abrams?

Who is Kyle Katarn? He is the most popular Star Wars character you have never heard of. Katarn is the protagonist in the uber-popular “Dark Forces” and “Jedi Knight” series of LucasArts video games. He is also featured in a series of popular Star Wars novels.

Big Hollywood:

Abrams’ “Star Wars: Episode VII” is part of big plans for The Walt Disney Co., which bought George Lucas’ Lucasfilm empire last year for $4.05 billion. The company is planning three sequels and two stand-alone spinoff movies focusing on characters from the “Star Wars” universe.

It is difficult to believe that Katarn will not be the subject of at least one spinoff film. Why? Katarn is easily the most interesting character in the Star Wars lexicon.

Katarn is a former Imperial Officer who had a change of heart, became a mercenary for the Rebellion, eventually becoming the personal “fix-it man” for Mon Mothma herself and eventually post Episode VI, Jedi. He is brilliant, conflicted, has an attitude, likes to act as if he is more morally ambiguous than he actually is and doesn’t care too much for rules, codes, or fighting fair. All that and a Jedi Master too. He is almost unique among Jedi in that he is as gifted in the Force as Mace Windu and wields force powers often preferred by the dark side of the force. In short, the Katarn character is a writer and director’s dream.

Kyle Katarn

“I’m no Jedi, I’m just a guy with a lightsaber and a few questions.”

Notable Katarn quotes:

Luke Skywalker: I sense a disturbance in the force.
Kyle Katarn: You always sense a disturbance in the force, but yeah, I sense it too.

Desann: You? You’re the legendary hero who killed Jerec at the Valley Of The Jedi? You look like nothing more than a bantha herder.
Kyle Katarn: And you look like an overgrown Kowakian monkey-lizard, so I guess looks don’t count for much.

Kyle Katarn: Never trust a bartender with bad grammar.

Kyle Katarn battles Jerec

Kyle Katarn battles Jerec

About Chuck Norton

Political issue strategist and communications professional. I write about politics, education, economics, morality and philosophy.
This entry was posted in Communications Theory, Culture War, Editorial. Bookmark the permalink.

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